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Looking to use Grade 5 Lesson 24 in your Grade 5 classroom?

While teaching this learning module you will cover multiple concepts including: Scale, Time Signature, Tempo, Beat

You'll also cover the themes of: Careers, Oceania, Our Musical World, Animal Songs

Grade 5 Lesson 24

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Introduction

In this lesson, you will:

  1. Play along with rhythms in 6/8 meter
  2. Review “Chumbara”
  3. Review the body percussion pattern for “Chumbara”
  4. Sing “Chumbara” while doing the body percussion pattern
  5. Sing “Chumbara” with a new word (randomizer)
  6. Learn about the major scale (compile slides)
  7. Teach “Click go the Shears”
  8. Learn about the song “Click go the Shears”
  9. Learn about the didgeridoo
  10. Watch a performance of someone playing a didgeridoo (rhythms by lewis)
  11. Teach “Deep and Wide”
  12. Learn the actions for “Deep and Wide”
  13. Sing and do the actions for “Deep and Wide”
  14. Option 1: Complete the solfa challenge for “Deep and Wide”
  15. Option 2: Complete the note name challenge for “Deep and Wide”
  16. Sort the rhythms for “Deep and Wide”
  17. Play “Which Rhythm Do You Hear?”

Extension:

Musicplay is a menu. The teacher is not expected to teach every song or activity. Choose the songs and activities from the list that will best fit your schedule and the needs of your students.

Objectives

  • I can sing and move to music.
  • I can sing a song in 6/8.
  • I can listen and answer questions.
  • I can read the C scale.
  • I can sing songs from a variety of times and places.
  • I can sing a song at different tempos.
  • I can read the rhythms of a song.

Play along with rhythms in 6/8 meter

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Practice Item Used: 22 ¥≤¥≤ qrr q. q e h.

Play along with rhythms in 6/8 meter

Choose how to perform the rhythms.

Use body percussion or instruments.

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Review “Chumbara”

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Song Used: Chumbara

Review “Chumbara”

This is an excellent activity for practice in keeping a steady beat and reading the notes of the major scale. The rhythms in this song should be taught by rote. However, the tone set is the major scale and the melody can be taught using solfa handsigns or letter names. This would be a good melody to learn to play (slowly) on Boomwhackers® or barred percussion instruments.

Review the body percussion pattern for “Chumbara”

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Song Used: Chumbara

Review the body percussion pattern for “Chumbara”

Copy the hand patterns for "Chumbara".

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Sing "Chumbara" while doing the body percussion pattern

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Song Used: Chumbara

Sing "Chumbara" while doing the body percussion pattern

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Sing “Chumbara” with a new word

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Song Used: Chumbara

Sing “Chumbara” with a new word

Artie Almeida is an amazing music educator and clinician from Florida, who's written and published some of the best resources ever created for music teachers.

She plays a game with Chumbara, where she creates word cards - each with just one syllable.
These words replace the nonsense word chum-ba-ra in the song.

One of our Musicplay teachers built a randomizer to choose the syllables. If the randomizer lands on Nag-O-Goo - you sing the melody of Chumbara to this new word.

So - enjoy the Chumbara silly syllables game with your students!

Learn About the Major Scale

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Unit Used: Key Signatures

Learn About the Major Scale

Teach “Click go the Shears”

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Song Used: Click Go the Shears

Teach “Click go the Shears”

This song is an Australian bush ballad. A bush ballad was a song written in the 19th century about Australian life during the years of settlement in the countryside. The song describes the scene in a sheep shearing shed. The verses included in the text are those most suitable and appropriate for use in a 5th grade classroom. Have the students listen to the song and ask them what they think the following terms mean: board, ringer, snagger, blow, bare-bellied yoe. Tell them what they actually mean.

Teach the song by rote and sing the song.

Learn about the song “Click go the Shears”

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Song Used: Click Go the Shears

Learn about the song “Click go the Shears”

This song is about shearing sheep. Teams of sheep shearers go from farm to farm in Australia, shearing hundreds of sheep in a day. They get paid by the number of fleece that they shear, so the shearer who shears the most gets the most pay. The “ringer” is the fastest sheep shearer in the barn. The “bare bellied yoe” is the sheep (ewe). The “old snagger” is another shearer.

Learn about the didgeridoo

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Song Used: Didgeridoo

Learn about the didgeridoo

The didgeridoo may be the world's oldest wind instrument. Studies of rock art in northern Australia have found pictures of the didgeridoo that are 1500 years old.

Listen to the excerpt and ask the students questions about the recording:
- What instrument family does this instrument belong to?
- How do you think the instrument is played?
- What country do you think this instrument comes from?

Do an Internet search to find more information on the didgeridoo. Students may enjoy doing a research project on world instruments or any instrument that has been used for a long time.

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Watch a performance of someone playing a didgeridoo

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Song Used: Didgeridoo

Watch a performance of someone playing a didgeridoo

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Teach “Deep and Wide”

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Song Used: Deep and Wide

Teach “Deep and Wide”

Use this song to review tempo terms and to practice reading the dotted quarter-eighth note rhythm. Read the rhythms and sing the melody using note names or solfege. When the students have learned the melody, sing the song.

Teach the actions and sing the song with actions.

Use this song to present the dotted quarter note-eighth note rhythm. Teach the students that a dot after a not increases its value by half of the value of the note. Lois Choksy taught that you add the value of a dot by adding the sound “m” to the note. Thus, ta when dotted would become ta-m. You would read this rhythm: ta-m ti (or use the rhythm names you prefer.) Read the rhythms and sing the melody using note names or solfa.

Learn the actions for “Deep and Wide”

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Song Used: Deep and Wide

Learn the actions for “Deep and Wide”

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Sing and do the actions for “Deep and Wide”

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Song Used: Deep and Wide

Sing and do the actions for “Deep and Wide”

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Option 1: Complete the solfa challenge for “Deep and Wide”

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Song Used: Deep and Wide

Option 1: Complete the solfa challenge for “Deep and Wide”

Option 2: Complete the note name challenge for “Deep and Wide”

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Song Used: Deep and Wide

Option 2: Complete the note name challenge for “Deep and Wide”

Sort the rhythms for “Deep and Wide”

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Song Used: Deep and Wide

Sort the rhythms for “Deep and Wide”

Play "Which Rhythm Do You Hear?"

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Game Used: Which Rhythm Do You Hear?

Play "Which Rhythm Do You Hear?"

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