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Looking to use PreK Lesson 19 in your PreK classroom?

While teaching this learning module you will cover multiple concepts including: Beat, Dynamics, Expression, Tempo, Timbre of Unpitched Instruments, Melodic Direction (high-middle-low)

You'll also cover the themes of: Alphabet Songs, Animal Songs, Our Musical World, Winter, Antarctica, Community Songs, Birds

PreK Lesson 19

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Introduction

In this lesson, you will:

  1. Sing the echos for “It’s Music Time”
  2. Say the “Hello Beat Chant”
  3. Review all the instruments using the Mystery Box
  4. Sing to Melody the Elephant
  5. Review “Elephants Have Wrinkles”
  6. Teach “Whoops Johnny”
  7. Do the actions for “Whoops Johnny”
  8. Read the “Ollie Otter” story
  9. Optional: Watch otters open and eat oysters
  10. Teach “Letter O”
  11. Teach “Ollie Otter”
  12. Sing “Ollie Otter” and copy the movements
  13. Optional: Practice printing the letter O
  14. Review “Roll the Snowball”
  15. Review “Letter P”
  16. Review “Perky Penguin”
  17. Sing and move to “Perky Penguin”
  18. Review “Penguins March”
  19. Review “Five Little Penguins”
  20. Sing our closing song “Skinamarink”

Musicplay is a menu. The teacher is not expected to teach every song or activity. Choose the songs and activities from the list that will best fit your schedule and the needs of your students.

Objectives

  • I can sing and move to music.
  • I can keep the beat.

Sing the echos for “It’s Music Time”

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Song Used: It’s Music Time

Sing the echos for “It’s Music Time”

Sing the echos for “It’s Music Time”.

Find something to use for instruments. Play along!

Video not working? Try a different video source.

Say the "Hello Beat Chant"

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Song Used: Hello Beat Chant

Say the "Hello Beat Chant"

Sing hellos in different ways. Pat the beat or play on jingle bells.

Review all the instruments using the Mystery Box

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Song Used: Mystery Box

Review all the instruments using the Mystery Box

After a few weeks, you will have shown the students several instruments. I like to do an activity I call the Mystery Box. I put 5-6 instruments in a box so the children can’t see what I’m playing. I play it, and they identify the instrument. It’s a great way to introduce them to the timbre of unpitched instruments, and to help build their vocabulary as they learn the names of all the instruments!

This month we have used: jingle bells, tambourines, hand drums, and triangles

Sing to Melody the Elephant

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Song Used: Melody the Elephant

Sing to Melody the Elephant

Practice distinguishing between speaking and singing voices by introducing a toy elephant named Melody. Melody the elephant will do what the children tell her, if they tell her in a “singing voice.” If they speak, she does nothing. Tell Melody to “jump up and down” using a speaking voice. Melody won’t move. Then sing to Melody to “jump up and down” and make your elephant jump. Invite the children to sing to Melody what to do. This activity helps the students to learn the difference between singing and speaking voices. It’s also great to encourage solo singing. You can soon tell who is matching pitch and who you need to work with when they sing to Melody.

Video not working? Try a different video source.

Review "Elephants Have Wrinkles"

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Song Used: Elephants Have Wrinkles

Review "Elephants Have Wrinkles"

Sing (or play) the song for your students and invite them to do the actions with you as you sing. (or show them the kids demo video) Then, invite the children to sing all the echoes in the song and do the actions. The repetitive verses in this song make it easy for the children learn, and they LOVE this song!

Video not working? Try a different video source.

Teach "Whoops Johnny"

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Song Used: Whoops Johnny

Teach "Whoops Johnny"

Demonstrate how to say the poem and do the finger motions. Then invite the children to do the motions with you. Substitute the children’s names for “Johnny.” Say the poem using a variety of expressions: quiet/loud, slow/fast, high voice/low voice.

Do the actions for "Whoops Johnny"

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Song Used: Whoops Johnny

Do the actions for "Whoops Johnny"

Starting with your pinky finger, touch each of your fingers in turn when you say, “Johnny.” When you say, “Whoops!” slide your finger from the tip of your pointer finger to the tip of your thumb. Say, “Johnny” on the thumb, then when you say “Whoops!” slide your finger from the tip of your thumb to the tip of your pointer finger. Touch each of your fingers in turn when you say, “Johnny.”

Video not working? Try a different video source.

Read the "Ollie Otter" story

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Song Used: O – Ollie Otter

Read the "Ollie Otter" story

Otters eat many different kinds of seafood. They can dive underwater and catch fish with their sharp and powerful jaws. Otters also eat some land animals. Adult otters need to eat about 20% of their body weight every day.

Ollie Otter loved to eat. He would eat anything that he could catch in the sea or on land near the shore. No one had ever taught Ollie that it was bad manners to chew with his mouth open. When he ate, any animals that were nearby could see what he was eating. It was disgusting to watch him eat. Ollie wondered why no one would join him at the lunch table. He decided to ask Ollie Octopus.

Octopus answered Ollie very slowly. “You see Ollie, no one wants to see what you are eating. You need to learn to eat with your mouth closed.”

“Oh,” said Ollie. “If that’s the only problem, I owe all of you an apology. I will learn to chew with my mouth closed.” So Ollie learned to chew with his mouth closed, and the octopus ate lunch with the otter every day.

Video not working? Try a different video source.

Optional: Watch otters open and eat oysters

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Song Used: O – Ollie Otter

Optional: Watch otters open and eat oysters

Video not working? Try a different video source.

Teach "Letter O"

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Song Used: O – Ollie Otter

Teach "Letter O"

Video not working? Try a different video source.

Teach "Ollie Otter"

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Song Used: O – Ollie Otter

Teach "Ollie Otter"

Play it again and sing along.

Create movements to go with the song.

If you need ideas for movement, watch the kids demo that follows.

Sing "Ollie Otter" and copy the movements

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Song Used: O – Ollie Otter

Sing "Ollie Otter" and copy the movements

Song starts at 1:15.

Video not working? Try a different video source.

Optional: Practice printing the letter O

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Song Used: O – Ollie Otter

Optional: Practice printing the letter O

If you prefer, have the children practice printing the letter O on a piece of paper and drawing two things that start with O.

Review "Roll the Snowball"

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Song Used: Roll the Snowball

Review "Roll the Snowball"

Review the chant with hand motions. Say the fingerplay using voices that go up/down, fast/slow, quiet/loud.

Choose an unpitched instrument and create an accompaniment for the chant. For example, play a drum on the words “roll, roll, and up, up, up.” Try out different instruments for “roll” and “up, up, up,” and have the students choose the instrument they like
the best.

Review "Letter P"

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Song Used: P – Perky Penguin

Review "Letter P"

Review "Perky Penguin"

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Song Used: P – Perky Penguin

Review "Perky Penguin"

Create movements for the song.

Or watch the video that follows for movement ideas.

Video not working? Try a different video source.

Sing and move to "Perky Penguin"

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Song Used: P – Perky Penguin

Sing and move to "Perky Penguin"

Copy the movements in the video or create your own! The song starts at 1:22.

Video not working? Try a different video source.

Review "Penguins March"

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Song Used: Penguins March

Review "Penguins March"

Teach the song by rote. Sing and move to the music. Invite the students to think of other ways that the penguins could move. Sing and move to the new verses.

Video not working? Try a different video source.

Review "Five Little Penguins"

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Song Used: Five Little Penguins

Review "Five Little Penguins"

Teach the song by rote. Sing and do the actions to the song.

Print a set of 5 penguins to use as manipulatives while you sing the song (manipulatives are available in the song's printables section). The first time you use them, the teacher should model. Each verse, you’ll take one penguin away and count the ones that are left. You can make class sets of penguins for the students to use. Cut them out and package five penguins in a ziplock bag. Glue the penguins onto different colors of cardstock. When you give out the ziplock bags, give each child a set with a different color background. This will help to keep the ziplock bags organized. The students enjoy singing and counting their own penguins as they sing.

Video not working? Try a different video source.

Sing our closing song “Skinamarink”

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Song Used: Skinnamarink

Sing our closing song “Skinamarink”

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